FB Can Be A Threat to Democracy, Says Ex GCHQ Boss

FB Can Be A Threat to Democracy, Says Ex GCHQ Boss

FB Can Be A Threat to Democracy, Says Ex GCHQ BossAccording to Robert Hannigan, former intelligence head of GCHQ, social media giant Facebook could become a threat to democracy around the world unless tougher regulations are imposed on it. The accusation comes after MP’s accused Facebook of striking private deals for its user data which prompted the former boss of GCHQ to comment that the firm was more interested in making money out of this private data instead of protecting privacy. During an interview with BBC’s Radio 4 Today program, Mr. Robert said that Facebook is not a charity firm that is providing free services to the public.

He affirmed that the organization is an international business setup that is using its platform for earning advertisement money on a global scale and makes billions in these endeavors. In return for the free connecting service that is useful for its users it accumulates their private data and squeezes every drop of profit from it. He insisted that Facebook is a threat as large monopolies like these cannot be expected to reform themselves and they have to be regulated by external forces. Recently internal emails of Facebook that were part of correspondence between its founder and his deputies were leaked which led to another campaign against it.

The cache of emails that were published by Digital Culture Media and Sport Committee had details of secret deals discussed between Facebook chief Zuckerberg and staff about giving special access to some developers and refusing others. These documents were published online as part of the department’s enquiry into fake news spread by the social network to discredit its opponents. But Facebook insisted that the documents had been depicted in a misleading manner and its actual context was something different. The files showed that Facebook had deliberately made it tough for its users to understand privacy changes that were made to its Android app.